Does gratitude rewire the brain

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Does gratitude rewire the brain

Does gratitude rewire the brain

This tradition can actually rewire your brain, and giving thanks year-round has tremendous benefits for your brain and body. Gratitude is an appreciation of what is meaningful to you. … Your hypothalamus is the part of your brain that regulates critical bodily functions like your appetite.

Every Thanksgiving, people reflect on what they’re most thankful for. This tradition can actually rewire your brain, and giving thanks year-round has tremendous benefits for your brain and body.

Gratitude is an appreciation of what is meaningful to you.You can train yourself to constantly be thankful for the little things in life.

Does gratitude rewire the brain

Gratitude is the healthiest of all human emotions. The more you express gratitude for what you have, the more likely you will have even more to express gratitude for. – Zig Ziglar

Your hypothalamus is the part of your brain that regulates critical bodily functions like your appetite. A National Institutes of Health study found that when you express kindness or feel gratitude, your hypothalamus floods your brain with dopamine. This gives you a natural high, motivating you to do good and express gratitude even more.

UCLA’s Mindful Awareness Research Center found that regularly expressing gratitude changes the molecular structure of your brain, keeps your gray matter functioning, and makes you healthier and happier.

Gratitude improves your physical health and energy levels.

  • Grateful people experience fewer aches and pains and are healthier.
  • According to a study published in Personality and Individual Differences, grateful people are more likely to take care of themselves.
  • They exercise more often and are more likely to keep regular doctors’ appointments, which contributes to longevity.
    • Gratitude reduces a multitude of toxic emotions, including envy, frustration, resentment, and regret.
    • Doctor Robert Emmons, a leading gratitude researcher, has found that gratitude increases happiness and reduces depression.Writing in a gratitude journal can reduce blood pressure by 10%. With the holidays coming up I wanted to focus on the one Turkey Day tradition that has the power to reshape your neural pathways. Sounds like an impressive feat, but it’s true. No it’s not the turkey increasing your serotonin (myth busted!), nor the apple pie giving you a burst of dopamine. As my intro suggests, it’s right there in the name. Thanks giving. Giving of thanks, also known as gratitude. Gratitude, particularly if practiced regularly, can keep you healthier and happier. In this article I’ll share the results of four studies that show how gratitude can, among other things, help you exercise more, sleep better and be happier.One study by a couple of American researchers assigned young adults to keep a daily journal of things they were grateful for (Emmons and McCullough, 2003). They assigned other groups to journal about things that annoyed them, or reasons why they were better off than others. The young adults assigned to keep gratitude journals showed greater increases in determination, attention, enthusiasm and energy compared to the other groups. While that shows a clear benefit of gratitude, it also makes a clear distinction. Realizing that other people are worse off than you is not gratitude. Gratitude requires an appreciation of the positive aspects of your situation. It is not a comparison. Sometimes noticing what other people don’t have may help you see what you can be grateful for, but you have to take that next step. You actually have to show appreciation for what you have, for it to have an effect.